MAY DAY

Sunday, May 1, 2016 - 00:00

Traditional English May Day rites and celebrations include Morris dancing, crowning a May Queen and celebrations involving a maypole. Much of this tradition derives from the pagan Anglo-Saxon customs held during "Þrimilci-mōnaþ"[6] (the Old English name for the month of May meaning Month of Three Milkings) along with many Celtic traditions. May Day has been a traditional day of festivities throughout the centuries. May Day is most associated with towns and villages celebrating springtime fertility (of the soil, livestock, and people) and revelry with village fetes and community gatherings. Perhaps the most significant of the traditions is the maypole, around which traditional dancers circle with ribbons.

May Day is known as Vappu in Finnish. This is a public holiday that is the only carnival-style street festivity in the country. People young and old, particularly students, party outside, picnic and wear caps or other decorative clothing. Some Finns make a special lemonade from lemons, brown sugar, and yeast called "sima." It contains very little alcohol, so even children can drink it. A similar product can also be bought in all stores. Some Finns also make doughnuts and a crisp pastry fried in oil made from a similar, more liquid dough. Balloons and other decorations like paper streamers are seen everywhere. (Wikipedia)

 

Photo: Wikipedia Commons

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